Gerber LMF II Review

Posted by Leighton Taylor on

 Video by: gideonstactical

Knife on deck: Gerber LMF II Survival Knife

This really hunky knife you’re drooling over right now is the Gerber LMF II Survival Knife. It’s a 10-inch knife that weighs 11.5 ounces. The drop point blade is 4.84 inches long, partially serrated, and made out of 420HC stainless steel.

The LMF II’s handle is made out of glass-filled nylon with TPV overmold; it has lanyard holes that allow it to be easily converted into a spear. One of the unique things about the LMF II (whether you’re talking about the Infantry model, the ASEK one, or this one) is that it has a pointed buttcap that can be used as a hammer or a glass breaker AND it’s physically separated from the tang in order to provide shock absorption and protection from electrocution.

Sounds all good, right? Well, it gets better. The LMF II comes with a really great sheath that has 3 retention points making it ready for action. It comes with several types of lashings so it can be attached to the lower leg, the thigh, the belt, a vest/jacket, etc. The sheath is fire resistant which is also great.

The best thing about this sheath, though, is its built-in sharpener. You don’t have to worry about bringing one around with you any time you go out in the field because it’s always with you whenever you carry this knife.

So, it seems that on the surface, the LMF II has everything going for it. As you can see in the beginning of the video, gideonstactical is pretty ecstatic about the features of the knife as well. But how well does it perform in the field?

It’s pretty heavy so while that could be a point against the knife, the other good features of the Gerber LMF II seem to cancel out any negatives the weight might pit against it. Before I digress any further though, let’s talk about how this hunk of steel “survives” in the wild.

FIELD TESTS

Detail Work

#1: The LMF II does perform well when doing detail work whether using the plain edge part of the blade or the serrated part. The shavings are almost paper thin. The handle of the knife fits the hand perfectly, providing the firm grip needed when exerting the level of control this kind of task requires.

Prying, Stabbing, (and Digging)

#2: The tip of the Gerber LMF II blade is extremely strong. It can be used to pry open almost anything open, which might be necessary since a crowbar isn't something that generally goes into a survival kit or camping gear.

The Gerber LMF II can also be used as a shovel if necessary, and it will definitely perform really, really well. While these kinds of tasks are not something you’ll generally be doing with this knife, knowing that the blade is able to withstand this kind of stress will be a comfort in a survival situation even if it is the only tool available.

Wood-processing Tasks

#3: For an almost 5-inch blade, the LMF II is quite a decent chopper. Gideonstactical gives it a grade of light to medium chopping. It isn’t the most ideal or the best one in the market but it will do in a pinch. This, of course, is one of those instances where the weight of the blade is a PRO because heavier weight definitely makes this kind of task easier. And while chopping might not be its forte, the knife can take a beating (as you can see in the video) without losing its edge. It can definitely be used in various wood processing tasks such as hacking and batoning (which the knife can do up to a point), and still remain sharp.

WHY WE LIKE  GERBER'S LMF II SURVIVAL KNIFE

The LMF II is an extremely sturdy knife with an incredibly strong tip. The blade is thick and retains its edge really well. The buttcap is really unique and the weight is not as bad as most would think. While the handle could be sturdier (as evidenced in the video), it does give a firm, comfortable grip. And let’s not forget that the LMF II’s sheath might just be one of the greatest sheaths out there. Overall, it’s not a perfect knife but it comes pretty close.

If you want to add this hunky blade to your collection, be sure to visit our store here!

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