Schrade SCHF3N Extreme Survival Knife Review

Posted by Leighton Taylor on

If you're looking for a survival knife that will give you an outrageous bang for your buck, you'll definitely want to look at the Schrade SCHF3N extreme survival knife. Schrade knives are generally known providing a high quality knife at lower-end prices.

The Schrade SCHF3N survival knife, in particular, is one of the most popular ones in their extreme survival series. We’re going to look at exactly what features this knife has and how it performs in the field.

Features of the Schrade Survival Knife:

We’ve already come up with a list of the most important features that any dependable survival knife should have. If you want to learn more about what they are and why we chose them, you can read about it here. So, how does the Schrade SCHF3N rate on our checklist?

Fixed blade – check.

Overall length of about 9-11 inches – check (11.75 inches overall).

Full tang – check.    

Straight Edge – check.

Good versatile sheath – check.

Sharp point – check.

Pros and Cons of the Schrade SCHF3N:

There’s a lot more to a great survival knife than its features--it’s the knife’s performance in the field that truly tells you if you’re handling one of the best. With the Schrade SCHF3N, I’ve got to say that it performs better than expected particularly for one in its price range.

Schrade’s SCHF3N blade is made of thick 7C17 high carbon stainless steel. I tested it out in a number of strenuous ways, and this survival knife is rock solid. As I mentioned above, the blade is a full tang as well as thick so this adds to the knife's strength and durability.

Aside from being tough, the SCHF3N holds its edge pretty well. It’s razor sharp right out of the box and can easily be maintained.

The SCHF3N is a medium-sized knife. It has a length and weight that's ideal for any all-around survival knife. It's long and heavy enough for performing demanding tasks such as chopping and batoning. But it isn't too bulky or unwieldy for performing detailed or delicate tasks. The Schrade SCHF3N looks like a combat or tactical knife especially since it's a hollow ground drop point blade. And it can effectively be used as one. It's great for piercing and can easily be lashed onto a stick to create a spear.

As for the SCHF3N’s handle, it’s very ergonomic. The Micarta slabs are tough, able to withstand all temperatures and various weather conditions. The light texture on the handle and the deep finger grooves provide you with a solid yet comfortable grip. There’s jimping on the spine of the handle, near the hilt, where you can place your thumb. This additional feature ensures that the knife really won't slip from your hand while you're using it. And should it ever slip, there’s a lanyard you can lash onto your wrist.

The Schrade SCHF3N extreme survival knife comes with a ballistic sheath with a plastic insert. It's a pretty good sheath for the price you're paying. It could stand to be thicker, more heavy duty but for its purpose, it holds up fine. It has multiple carry options and even has an external pocket for small survival items that you might want to carry with you such as a fire starter or a compass.

All in all, I’d say that the Schrade SCHF3N survival knife is a strong, durable, dependable knife. It performs well in the field despite what others may say about the type of steel it is constructed from. And for the amount of money it costs, it's a truly excellent bargain.

View the Schrade SCHF3N Extreme Survival Knife on Amazon!

Survival Knife Reviews Survival knives

← Older Post Newer Post →



Comments


  • I’ve had more expensive knives. The schrade has become my favorite. Theguys at deer camp thought I was going all “Rambo” with such a big knife, but when we started seeing bears on a regular basis, they had to have one too. I went to work and made a leather sheath and kept the plastic insert.I’m gonna sound like a commercial, but its a great knife!

    David L. Darling on
  • High carbon stainless steel is basically a mixture of carbon steel and stainless steel—it’s generally thought of as a higher quality stainless steel alloy. Here’s a good article I found that explains it in a little more detail: http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-high-carbon-stainless-steel.htm

    SKE on
  • How can you have “high carbon stainless steel”? I did not think this was possible.

    Gregg Collins on

Leave a comment